Firespeaking

Masonry Heaters, Wood-Fired Ovens, Natural Building

Big Bear Camp Barrel Oven

We were very happy to get hired by our neighbors Hal and Tonia of Big Bear Camp to lead a workshop to build a Barrel Oven.  We took the opportunity to make our first glass door for the Barrel Oven Kit and are thrilled by the result.  We think it speaks for itself….

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In its few months of existence, the oven has already cooked food for a number of neighborhood pizza parties, been part of the October menu for the Epicurean Bears Club, as well as helped prepare the feast for a pre-Thanksgiving get-together. We love seeing the glow of the fire as the food is cooking. Hal and Tonia report that they often just sit with the oven and a cup of tea as it is pre-heating. Stay tuned for a post about the neighborhood kids and their Big Bear Camp Barrel Oven baked gingerbread houses!

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Further Reading:

Written by in: Recent,Wood-fired ovens |

Blacksmithed Shelf Brackets

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I am excited about these recent results from the metal shop.  I’d like to make more of these for this holiday season and have them both in stock and as something of value that I can take to fairs, exchanges, etc.  Shelf brackets are a great way to mount shelves and so many of the options available at the hardware store are not as solid as you would like them to be.

Masonry Heater in Bend, OR

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Masonry heaters are a relatively new tradition in North America. We do not have the same tactile memory that many Europeans do of experiencing the warm, thorough heat. As such, many of us builders spend a lot of time educating potential clients. This was not the case with the Allens!

This was their fourth masonry heater in as many homes! They knew exactly what they wanted and knew all of the benefits of living with a masonry heater from their many years of experience with them. Their first heater was a “Russian” heater and their second two were built from Tempcast kits. Although satisfied with the Tempcasts they had, they hired us because they were interested in the Masonry Heater Association’s 5-run design due to its compact footprint and top-venting chimney.

Process….

(hover for descriptions, click to enlarge)

Read more….

 

Oven at Wise Acres Farm – Eugene, OR

   

We built this wood-fired earth oven at Wise Acres Farm, a beautiful place and home to Dr. Sharol Tilgner, author of “Herbal Medicine from the Heart of the Earth”! The beautiful brick oven base was built by Max and the earth oven project was led and finished by Eva during a workshop. The clay, sand and straw for the oven were gathered from the local area. The oven is well insulated and is functioning beautifully.

Custom Masonry Heater at Abundant Solar (Corvallis, OR)

(click on images to enlarge, hover over for descriptions)

the beginning

stainless steel hot water pipes carved into replaceable firebox liner

oven/core detail

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layout for the jack arch

dylan boye tooling joints

flue liner detail

(process photos by Dylan Boye)

Have you ever heard of Earthships?  The term refers to a grouping of design principles that aims to make houses as self-sufficient as possible.  They were pioneered by a man named Michael Reynolds, a creative architect genius from New Mexico, who wanted to move away from homes being consumer boxes that demand resources like water and electricity from a grid and require connections to such things as septic dumps and trash collection.  Instead, he made concepts such as rain-water harvesting and storage, grey water treatment, micro-power generation and extreme passive solar design for heating and cooling shape the form and function of “earthship” homes.  The specifics of his design principles are honed for the climate of the southwest which includes very cold but sunny winter days and a scarcity of water.  I have always felt it an interesting challenge to understand how we might apply these same principles to other climates.  In the Pacific Northwest where we live, for example, the sun rarely shines in the winter time but the forests that abound are extreme accumulators for the solar energy that shines during the rest of the year.  As we worked on this project, influenced by the clients’ affinity for earthship design and a shared interest in applying these ideas to our bioregion and our lifestyles, I came to see the masonry heater we were building both as this vessel’s navigation deck from which they will be able to stay warm and steer through the colder parts of the year.

This masonry heater was built at the home of James Reismiller (owner of Abundant Solar) and Cassandra Robertson (environmental engineer and excellent singer-songwriter).  They did a great job of researching and planning for this heater.  The outside air source and reinforced foundation had already been installed before we were brought on.  In fact, the house was pretty much completed except for this central element.  They wanted a heater that would flow with their modern clean lines and be consistent with an ecological way of building.  They wanted to heat water, they wanted an all-season bake oven, and they wanted a configuration of heated benches that would flow well with their stairs as sitting space for house concerts.  So…. we got to work and designed and built the heater.

It is based on the Contraflow with the 22″ replaceable firebox from the Masonry Heater Association Plan Portfolio.  The interesting design challenge was to both provide for the heated benches as well as preserve access to the ash box, especially while needing to meet the low height of the second stair which meant that the bench’s flue could not cross above the access to the ash drawer.  The utility room which houses their hot water tanks for distributed radiant floor heating and domestic hot water is directly the other side of the back wall so the natural thermosiphon loop for the hot water was very simple and straight forward.  The bricks we used for the facing were very dense recycled pavers that beautifully reveal the flame patterns of the kiln they were fired in.  The bench and trim details are soapstone that were cut and polished on site from slabs that were seconds at a counter top shop.

Stay tuned for photos with fire as well as possibly a stop-motion video of the process!

This heater begs to make gracious acknowledgment to the following:

  • Cassandra and James for the opportunity to participate in their home’s construction and their hospitality.
  • Dylan Boye for his hard work, precision in cutting, and general assistance.
  • Kiko Denzer for his assistance especially in laying out and cutting the soapstone
  • Eva for coming at the end and helping to finish up and giving it her special pretty touch.
  • Marcus Flynn of Pyromasse for his generous documentation, tutorials and correspondence.  See this great tutorial on how-to-build a jack arch.
  • Norbert Senf of Masonry Stove Builders and Steve Bushway of Deerhill Masonry for their readiness to offer advice especially in the design stage… and to the whole MHAMembers chat list for great discussion which contributed enormously at various points in the build.

Read more….

Wood-Fired Barrel Oven in Swannanoa, NC

A practical and wood-efficient oven built by hand from local clay, river sand and recycled red clay bricks. Project is evolving into a fully developed outdoor kitchen with counter tops, a wood-fired griddle, a sink and more! The whole area will be roofed as well. Stay tuned for more good times and stories of this family oven at Davidson Farm.

Sculpted Guitar Oven in Brevard, NC

Eva led a workshop in April to build this oven at the Duckpond Pottery, Nick Friedman and Jennifer Kelly’s retail pottery shop and venue for live original music. Nick had an awesome idea to make an oven in the shape of a jazz hollow body guitar! We harvested clay from just down the street and sand from the French Broad River. The people of Brevard are so talented and so much fun! Expect some amazing natural building projects to blossom there soon.

Firespeaking - 91040 Nelson Mountain Rd., Deadwood, OR 97430 - info (at) firespeaking.com - (541) 964-3536 - OR CCB# 200122